LeaderImpact Podcast

Ep 47 - Darrel Janz - Beyond the Broadcast

November 08, 2023 LeaderImpact Episode 47
LeaderImpact Podcast
Ep 47 - Darrel Janz - Beyond the Broadcast
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

We sit down with Darrel Janz as he shares about the excitement, challenges, and innovation during his 60 years in radio and television. Darrel’s infectious passion for current affairs and sports took him on an extraordinary career path, traveling all over Canada and earning a remarkable reputation in the broadcasting industry.

But Darrel’s story is not just about the glamour of the broadcasting world. It’s a testament to the power of family, love, and sacrifice, as he made hard decisions to prioritize his loved ones, showcasing the vital balance between career and family life. His candid reflections on remaining connected in our technology-driven society are valuable for everyone grappling with the demands of work-life balance.

Darrel also opens up about his faith journey, illustrating how it has shaped his life and career. It’s a compelling tale of strength, belief, and the power of prayer that has guided him through life's ups and downs. Join us on this riveting episode, where we explore the intersections of broadcasting, faith, family, and leadership.

Thanks for listening!

Click here to take the LeaderImpact Assessment and to receive the first chapter of Becoming a Leader of Impact by Braden Douglas.

Remember, impact starts with you!

Speaker 2:

Welcome to the Leader Impact podcast. We are a community of leaders with a network in over 350 cities around the world dedicated to optimizing our personal, professional and spiritual lives to have impact. This show is where we have a chance to listen and engage with leaders who are living this out. We love talking with leaders, so if you have any questions, comments or suggestions to make this show even better, please let us know. Best way to stay connected in Canada is through our newsletter at LeaderImpactca or social media at LeaderImpact. If you're listening from outside of Canada, check out our website at LeaderImpactcom. I'm your host, Lisa Peters, and our guest today Darrel Janz. Darrel entered this world in 1941 on a farm northeast of Swift Current, saskatchewan. Graduating from Herbert High School, he moved on to graduate Saskatchewan Teachers College in 1961. Studying for only one year in a one-room, a multigrade school on the edge of the Quapal Valley north of Regina was just about enough for him, because as soon as school was out for the summer, he began his incredible broadcasting career at CFAM in Manitoba. By 1963, he made his way to do radio and TV news at CHAB in Moushchah and soon began a 60-year adventure with CTV taking him across Canada. He anchored the CTV Calgary news for 40 years, from 2013 to 2023, and did a weekly feature for CTV called Inspired Albertans. In June 2023, Darrel began co-hosting a weekly talk show that runs on YES TV called Legacy Makers. He has been involved with LeaderImpact since 2016 and became a co-leader in 2017. A widower with two children on Vancouver Island and a stepson in High River Alberta, Darrel continues to be active speaker and emcee and has a voice of gold.

Speaker 1:

Welcome to the show Darrel. Thank you very much, lisa, good to be with you. It is nice, you're near my roots.

Speaker 2:

Yes, I am, and I have a cabin on Lake Diefenbaker which is even closer to your roots. Oh, definitely.

Speaker 1:

As a matter of fact, if you have time someday, I have some great Lake Diefenbaker stories.

Speaker 2:

Are they like big fish stories?

Speaker 1:

Well, that's the latter part. The earlier part is when Diefenbaker was having that damn build.

Speaker 2:

Yes, we have friends out there that were there for that, but I would love to hear your story because you're the news guy, you're it. So thank you again for joining us, Darrel, it is nice to be here with you. So our podcast over the last few weeks has really sort of taken this turn to really dive deep into pivotal points greatest failures, mistakes, principles of successes. So that's where we're going to head, because I think that's where some of our greatest stories are. So, if you're ready to begin, I'm going to start with asking you to tell us a little bit about your professional story and how you got to where you are today and if you can give us a couple of snapshots that were pivotal turning points along that journey.

Speaker 1:

Well, my mom told me that it really started in that farmhouse in which I was born at Main Center, Saskatchewan, and at the age of two she said I would be playing in the kitchen while she had the battery powered radio on. We didn't have electricity yet and she said I'd be playing on the floor or sitting in my high chair, paying no attention to the music that was being played on the radio. But as soon as the music stopped and the announcers started talking, at age two I would start mimicking the announcers, repeating what they were saying, and so she said I figured you'd be a broadcaster.

Speaker 2:

Really at age of two.

Speaker 1:

At age of two so, and all through at age four or so, maybe three, when the war was still underway, my dad always listened to the CBC radio news at eight o'clock at night. It wasn't at 11 back then, it was or 10. It was at eight o'clock and it was radio news and it was read by Lauren Green. Before he went to Hollywood he did the CBC national news on CBC Saskatchewan and all of the CBC stations, and while my brothers would be playing on the floor I would go and sit with dad and listen to the Lauren Green news and I was mesmerized by this incredible voice and it just fascinated me. Plus, the war fascinated me even at that stage and current affairs in general fascinated me from a very young age and at age four. If dad went to Swift Current and brought home a Regina leader post, I would. After he was finished with it, I would read it at age four, I was nobody ever taught me to read, it's just a God given gift. And so by the time I was in junior high, I was whipping the grade 12s in current affairs quizzes, and my current affairs teacher, or my social studies teacher, mr Swatzke, began to recommend a career in journalism. I also had a high school coach, mr Gorious, who saw my love of sports but my total inapness at them, and so he recommended a career in sports casting. And so I kind of blended the two and became a journalist on radio and television rather than at a newspaper, the way Mr Swatzke envisioned it, because writing was also a passion of mine. So it was just kind of natural. And yet at that time there were not schools like there are today teaching that stuff, except for Ryerson in Toronto, and that was so far away. No Saskatchewan kid would even dream of going there to go to school. And so you got a job in a small radio station and for me that happened to be Altona Manitoba C-F-A-M radio, in what is today a much larger company called Golden West Radio. And in 1962, on July 1st, dominion Day 1962, I began my career by covering the Dominion Day picnic in Dominion City, a little place with a big name, south of Winnipeg, right near the North Dakota border, first place in Canada to flood whenever the Red River overflows its banks. And so that was my beginning. Worked there for a year and then, in the fall of 1963, got hired at C-H-A-B in Moose Jaw to do both radio and television, and as soon as I sat in front of a TV camera I knew I'd found my game. And so that lasted for well so far, for 60 years and counting, because I'm still working and happy to be doing it.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I love your story when I listen to those teachers that encouraged you. You know people that say you know you should do this, and I mean you never became a like sports broadcaster. But well, I don't think you did. Did you? Did I miss that?

Speaker 1:

Well, I did sportscast when I worked. My journey was Altona Moosja. Well, I really have to be fair. I was three months at CJGX Radio in York and Saskatchewan spinning country music, and while I didn't mind it, it was kind of fun. And I remember two songs from that summer of 63 when I was spinning this country music was Johnny Cash's Ring of Fire and Porter Wagner had a big hit called. I've Enjoyed as Much of this as I Can Stand, and so those are the two songs that stick in my mind. But after three months of that I quit and and CHAB gave me a job doing just news. Saskatoon was also just news for three years at CFQC and then four years in Montreal, and you'd think in what was in the biggest private station in Canada, you'd think that you'd be more pigeon holed Then in the smaller stations. But no, I did more stuff at CFCF in Montreal than I did at these smaller stations. I did sports, I did weather, I did news News mainly, oh, and I did traffic helicopter reports and survived a crash into the St Lawrence River.

Speaker 2:

Yeah you, you survived a crash.

Speaker 1:

I survived a crash. I stole the stole the front page from the Expo's, the Montreal Expo's. On the first day they played a home game against the St Louis Cardinals. We were covering traffic and we crashed into the St Lawrence River that day, and so the next day we kind of shared the headlines with the Expo's in the English papers.

Speaker 2:

Wow, look at you making news. You're crashing. What I also love about your story is just there was no schools, as you said. When you mean, since you were two, you were reciting the news and amazed and reading the newspaper there, ryerson, was it right? And that was a long ways from Swift quarantine.

Speaker 1:

Oh yeah, no kidding.

Speaker 2:

And just to get in, start doing those things and getting involved and and like do it, almost doing it yourself, and having teachers who were like you can do this. It's inspiring you.

Speaker 1:

I've spoken at many a teacher's convention and I tell them this story and I say you have no idea how much influence you have on a, an impressionable young person, to hear from one of you, from a teacher hey, you're good at this, why don't you make that your career? And and I owe both Mr Swatsky and Mr Gorious a lot for the success of my career- yeah, oh, that's awesome and good.

Speaker 2:

Shout out to those two people and thank you for sharing. So our next question is just about your best, if you can give us your best principle of success and tell us a story that illustrates this.

Speaker 1:

The best I can offer is do whatever they ask you to do within reason, as long as it's legal and moral. Do it If they ask you to do it. And and I had many examples of that I was asked to cover things that I would not have wanted to cover, but there was nothing wrong, nothing illegal or immoral about it, and so I did it and it added to my resume. It added to my reputation as someone who'll do what you ask them to do. But I also refused to do a few things because they were not, in my mind, moral. Legal, perhaps, yes, moral, no. I'll give you the best example I have in the somewhere in the 1980s, long before the principle F word was used as frequently as it is today. So our court reporter here at CTV Calgary came back from a case where that word had been used in testimony and he felt it belonged in there. Our producer agreed with him and wanted to put it in. I wasn't going to be reading it, but he was going to be saying it in his, in his report, and so finally it had to come down to an adjudication by our director of news and public affairs, and thank God he came down on my side because I was ready to put my job on the line for that. I did not feel it belonged in a supper hour newscast where kids were listening and so on, and today that word is far too commonly used, but back then it wasn't, and I wasn't about to read the first newscast in which it was included.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, I find. And what year was this? It would have been like you said, 80s, I think 83, 84 somewhere in there. I find that amazing because as you listen to, I don't hear it. I don't hear the F word a lot, I'll have to admit, but I hear offensive language.

Speaker 1:

You live a sheltered life.

Speaker 2:

Clearly I do too much community television. I see, yeah, but when I do hear it, I turn it off and I probably won't listen to that station again because it's common right, it is their language, it is just, and I will turn it off. But to actually put your job on the line, for. You know that's a big deal and I get you know. If it's an effort, or if it's something the president's not doing or some way, you've been treated. Yeah, you know, morally it's wrong.

Speaker 1:

Yes, yeah, and but you know, wherever possible, I said yes.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, and, like you said, it added to your resume those stories you may not have wanted to cover, but it was legal and it was more. Yeah, I'll remember that when I'm doing stories, because Sometimes I'm just I don't know if I should cover this. But thank you for sharing those. Those are great stories. So I'm not sure where you sit with your your failures and mistakes, but I think we all know we learn from those. We learn more from our failures and mistakes than our own successes and I was wondering if you could share one of your greatest failures or mistakes and what you have learned.

Speaker 1:

Well, my greatest failure, my greatest mistake was putting career ahead of family and it ended in a divorce and and long estrangement from two wonderful kids. But God has brought about a reconciliation in recent years. Their mother passed away of cancer in 19 or 2013 and we have had, just in the last few years, an incredible Reconciliation that only God could have brought about and we have a wonderful Relationship now. They're two wonderful people living on the beautiful West Coast of Vancouver Island, far from, far from Saskatoon where they were born, montreal where they kind of started life, and then Calgary, where they grew up and lived here until after their mother's passing and then Moved out there, and both are very, being very successful out there. Yeah and and so To. To conclude my answer to your question biggest mistake, and from which I Hopefully learned, was was putting career ahead of family.

Speaker 2:

So in the time that it happened. So go back how many years when you were putting your career. What were your thoughts? Where you're like I need to do this. This is the only way I'm gonna get ahead. I'm not gonna get noticed if I don't work this hard because I'm I'm a woman who is working how many hours a day so I can get ahead. And I always tried to sort of when my kids got home from you know, like that time I, I committed, but I can understand that we want to get ahead.

Speaker 1:

So Maybe, maybe we need some advice well, for for a kid who grew up in a large family and I, I didn't have the athletic skills of my two brothers, one older, one younger. There was a lot I didn't have. The two things I was good at were writing and talking, and so when I Finally got a job that gave me recognition as a kid, I felt well, the one time I would feel recognized is when they put me up on the stage as a, as an elementary school student, to recite poems or Something along that line, or in high school, when they put me in in a drama and in a play where, I Must admit, I kind of stole the show, and so it it. It was so good for the ego, and so that that is what began to drive me, and, and so, even after I married, sadly, that Took priority over and, and men, especially women, today more so than in years past, have a tendency to do that and to be identified by their career, by their job. And so I thought you know, if I don't put on all this time and all this effort, then I'll never go anywhere. And so Once I got to Calgary, I never did go anywhere, but I did okay here, and and so I. I just felt I needed to do that. But looking back now I sometimes think if I had put more effort into my family and less into my career, I might have done even better at my career, because there would have been that, that satisfaction of being a good husband and a good dad.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, you're not the first one to ever say that. On our podcast I've heard similar stories of one I think it was Bruce and he talked about that and he, he, he's good in his marriage. But there was a point where he realized like things need to change and. I need to go home and turn off. We are too connected as I hold up my phone.

Speaker 1:

Oh.

Speaker 2:

Right like this is by my bag. I need to let go.

Speaker 1:

Yes, easy, it's very important. I'm trying, I have mine. Mine is my alarm clock.

Speaker 2:

Yes, but.

Speaker 1:

I try to ignore it during the night. When, when nature calls in the middle of the night, I try to ignore it because if you spend any time on it, you'll wake up enough that it'll be difficult getting back to sleep.

Speaker 2:

Yes, right, I need to take. I'm going through a change of life, darryl, so I wake up in a little bit of a hot sweat On my phone. Actually, I just need to go away. I need to go back to the old-style alarm clock, where it's just an alarm clock.

Speaker 1:

That's a good idea, and and on on nights, when I don't have to be somewhere. The next morning I don't set my alarm, I and I leave my phone elsewhere, and Every once in a while I have wakened in the morning and reached for it and it wasn't there. And I thought good, because if they do occupy far too much of our time, yes, we have to know what everybody else is doing, as. I say, we do yeah oh, it's just a.

Speaker 2:

I needed this lesson today, thank you. So I mean, you've been involved in leader impact for many years and you became a co-leader in 2017, so you know that our goal is we want to grow professionally, personally and spiritually For increasing impact. So would you be willing to share an example of how the spiritual makes a practical difference in your life as a leader?

Speaker 1:

Spiritual is who I am. It wasn't always the case. I went to the far country like the particle Sun for a time and God has a wonderful way of answering mother's prayers and and he, he dragged me back and I won't say kicking and screaming, I didn't kick and scream, but he worked at me for a long time and and I had to wind up Pretty low before I finally said okay, I got to go home to the father's house and Get this thing straightened out and then my spiritual life became the core of who I am and it made such a difference in in so many ways. People at work saw the difference. I'll give you one kind of funny example Back when, in the 80s, when political correctness was just becoming a big issue and today it's gone to ridiculous extremes. But back then we were sitting in the cafeteria at CTV Calgary one day and Talking about this whole political correctness issue and I Said well, you know, there's really only two Groups of people you can make fun of these days publicly and get away with it. One is white males and the other is born-again Christians. And one of our sports guys, who was quite a Religious and and almost anti-religious, looks at me with a smirk and says, yes, you both ways, doesn't it? And I thought, okay, I'm glad they notice not that I'm a white male, that's obvious. Yeah, that I'm a believer, and they knew it. I I wasn't. I wasn't preachy about it, but I also wasn't silent about it. Yeah, I said to one co-worker one time who claimed to be an atheist I said well, I wish I had your faith. And he kind of a double-take. He said what do you mean? I have no faith. I said oh, yes, you do. I said it takes far more faith to believe what you believe than what I believe, because there's so much evidence for what I believe and there's no evidence for what you believe.

Speaker 2:

Wow, and, and where did that conversation go? Oh.

Speaker 1:

That was the end of it for them. It didn't go any further.

Speaker 2:

So when you in the 1980s, when you talked about your best principle of success and you said legal, moral, and you said you wouldn't say the F Word, you wouldn't let allow it to happen.

Speaker 1:

Mm-hmm.

Speaker 2:

This was, was this part of Growing and just saying no, I'm, we're gonna stop this right here.

Speaker 1:

I'm Christian, I'm not doing this, yes, yeah, that plus. As word got out that I had surrendered my life, I started to get an increasing number of requests to come and Speak to men's breakfast, ladies, banquets, various other things, and share my story and and there's nothing better for your growth than to go out and put yourself out there on on on the plank, and Tell your story and and be be brutally honest. Don't just don't whitewash it. Yeah, and it's, it's so important.

Speaker 2:

I would agree with you and I think that's why I show up here every, you know, every episode is. For that reason I I have to hear this, I have to be here as much as I'm interviewing. I Get fulfillment from this, like I get something. But interesting, that the treating the differently and now people are like Darrel should come speak to our group. He, he has, he is a follower of Jesus and he has story. And to be real about that story, that's very important.

Speaker 1:

And yeah, because You've heard the term secret service Christians who you know they're believers but they don't. They don't say much about it. Yeah, and and I I had some great mentors, some wonderful Christian men, businessmen, professionals and so on, who really showed me what it was like to be a Christian in the public eye. When I first surrendered my life, I Said to God okay, I'm a public person. If you want me to go public with this surrender of mine, with my walk with you, then you're going to have to arrange it, because I don't know how to go about that. I had a younger brother who was a great preacher and he had no problem confronting anyone with the gospel. And not more than a few weeks after I had said that to God, a local pastor in Calgary who was doing a weekly TV show program on our station and recording in our studio, came to me and said understand God's vented work in your life. I said, oh. I said you've been talking to the pastors at my church. He said yeah, and he said will you come on my show and talk about it? And I said, god, you didn't have to act that fast, but I know he did, because that created an accountability. I used to love going into the supermarket, the mall and having people tell me how great I was and so on. I knew it wasn't true, but I still enjoyed it. And now what meant the most was when fellow believers would come up to me in the store in the mall and say saw you on that program. And now every time I see you reading the news, I pray for you. And that meant more to me than anything.

Speaker 2:

Earlier, when you had said you know talking about your journey and sharing that outwardly to the public. If I heard correctly, I'm thinking you grew up in a Christian family. You left for a while and then you came back and your mom prayed for you, and you're like mom's prayers.

Speaker 1:

Yes.

Speaker 2:

And I think we didn't all grow up in beautiful Christian families. Some did, some didn't. As I watch my children, they just both moved out and I raised them as best I could. And now they're in another city three hours away and I can't be there. But I raised them and I know they'll come back. You know they're probably not going to church. I know they believe and I know it's my prayer too as a parent. You know they'll find their way.

Speaker 1:

As I said, praying mothers are one of the most powerful weapons God has.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I've got a rats. Just a quote I got to write down, thank you. So I believe these are sort of my last two questions. I had a wealth. I seem to ask all the guests the same question, but we talk about lasting impact. Of course, leader impact is dedicated to leaders having a lasting impact. So, as you continue to move your through your own journey of life, have you considered what you want your faith legacy to be when you leave this world?

Speaker 1:

Well, first of all, to see my children continue the incredible heritage that they inherited. My family goes back generations, both of my great-grandfathers on my mother's side and my father's side. When they came from Russia as Mennonite migrants, they both planted in their own respective communities, planted the first Mennonite brethren church in those communities and then in my dad's family. My dad was the oldest of 11 children, eight boys, eight men, and he stayed and farmed the family farm in Saskatchewan, at Maincedar. But three of his brothers formed the core of the Janz gospel quartet and then a brother in law sang the bass. There were no basses in that generation of Janz, as they were all tenors and baritones, but no deep basses. So as an adult I had a childhood dream come true I got to sing with my three uncles. The brother-in-law stepped out and let me sing with them, and to this day it touches me so deeply standing there with these men that I had so admired all my life, and to sing with them was incredible. So I want my legacy to live on through my children, who are both followers of Christ and also people that I want to get to heaven and see, people that are there at least in some part because of me and some. I know about some, but some I probably don't know about, and so when I get there I want to see people like that, but the first thing I want to hear is well done, good and faithful servant.

Speaker 2:

Well done when you talk about. I married into a Mennonite family the Peters and my first. Well, one of many family reunions and the singing it brings you to tears.

Speaker 1:

Well, when you walk past the nursery in a Mennonite church, you hear the babies crying in four-part harmony.

Speaker 2:

You do, I bet. Oh yeah, that's why I always say it's the four-part harmony. It's. How do you know this? And even I mean to this day. You know, funerals happen and everyone goes and they are all in the choir. And it is yeah, it's a beautiful thing, Thank you for sharing that. So, Darrel, to continue on, my last question is just what brings you the greatest joy?

Speaker 1:

The greatest joy is when I see a prayer for a soul answered. And I've had that happen quite a number of times, where fellow workers have come to me to my desk and said I accepted Christ on the weekend, and I jump up, give them a hug and say I've been praying for that and they said I thought you probably had and that just gives me that. And seeing my children after all this time, that is probably my greatest joy of all and the fact that they have such a good relationship with God. Yeah, that is. And they tell me I didn't see them for many years. But they tell me there are things about the intervening years I'm not going to tell you about and so that's fun. They don't have to, but just to see where they are at today is just such a blessing.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, oh. So when someone comes to your desk and they say that to you, and is it an emotional moment?

Speaker 1:

Oh it is, Can I?

Speaker 2:

say that yeah.

Speaker 1:

Mm-hmm. Definitely.

Speaker 2:

Yeah.

Speaker 1:

Definitely.

Speaker 2:

So we've spent the last 33 minutes together and I've heard a lot of stories. Is there anything else? Have I not asked you any questions? I feel like I have an icon, a CTV icon, and I'm like and it was funny because, as we were about to begin, you are, I think Paul prayed for you and I was listening in and just living in the moment and I don't know if there's, is there anything else, any other story that you can share with our viewers that might lift them up? I don't know, I just I have this.

Speaker 1:

Well, whenever I now publicly tell my story of reconciliation with my kids, you can't believe how many people come up to me and say thank you. I needed that encouragement because I didn't realize how many estranged families there are and what a blessing it is to them to hear a story of reconciliation. It gives them hope.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, that's a great message, and I think we have to keep sharing, don't we, Darrel?

Speaker 1:

Oh, we do. Absolutely, absolutely. It's not something you ought to keep to yourself.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, all right. Well, this ends our podcast. But if anyone is listening and thinking I want to hear Darrel speak or I would like to book him because I know you're still active, or how can they find you and engage with you? Where would be the best way?

Speaker 1:

The best place would be on my email. It's Darrel D-A-R-R-E-L. Nearly, even though it was supered on the bottom of the screen for 40 years here. I anchored for 40 years at CTV Calgary and every day my name was supered there, but even to this day the majority of people spell my name. They'll email me at D-A-R-R-E-Ljanz1. That's. I'll finish giving you that J-A-N-Z-1, digit one at gmailcom.

Speaker 2:

OK.

Speaker 1:

And so, anyway, they'll send me something at D-A-R-R-E-L. And then they'll say hi, Darrel, d-a-r-y-l, because that's the most common spelling.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, maybe they got auto corrected. Life is auto corrected.

Speaker 1:

Well, auto correct. Can I tell you a little funny thing that somebody sent me a little meme about auto correct. You know it helps if you think of auto correct as a tiny elf inside your phone trying so hard to be helpful but is in fact quite drunk.

Speaker 2:

Then it just makes you laugh.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, exactly.

Speaker 2:

And are you on LinkedIn? If anyone wants to find more about you, I'm on.

Speaker 1:

LinkedIn. Yes, I'm on LinkedIn. That's the only social media I'm on. I was on Twitter for quite a while, but I quit. We aged out?

Speaker 2:

I don't know yeah.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's.

Speaker 2:

OK, linkedin, I'm with you there. I like it there too. Well, darrell, I want to thank you for taking the time out of your day. I know that it was hard to get you scheduled. You are a busy guy, which is fantastic, but I just want to thank you for sharing this time with us.

Speaker 1:

Thank you very much, lisa. It's a pleasure, all right.

Speaker 2:

Well, if you're listening and if you're part of Leader Impact, you can always discuss or share this podcast with your group. And if you are not yet part of Leader Impact and would like to find out more and grow your leadership, find our podcast page on our website at leaderimpactca and check out our free leadership assessment. You will also find on our web page chapter one of Brayden Douglas' book Becoming a Leader of Impact. You can also check out groups available in Canada at leaderimpactca or, if you're listening from anywhere else in the world, check out leaderimpactcom or get in touch with us by email infoatleaderimpactca and we will connect you. And if you like this podcast, please leave us a comment, give us a rating or review. This will help other global leaders find our podcast. Thank you for engaging with us and remember Impact starts with you.

Daryl Jans' Broadcasting Journey
Balancing Career and Family
Faith, Legacy, and Joy
Thanking Darrell, Promoting Leader Impact